Water is a Major Key is Heart Health

Water is probably one of the most overlooked tools against heart disease. Researchers from Loma Linda University in California confirmed this some years ago by checking the water intake of about twenty thousand well-educated men and women (ages 38 to 100) as a possible risk factor for fatal coronary artery disease (heart attacks). In a 2002 study (Chan), they concluded that water indeed had a strong protective association for both sexes.

Researchers have found elevated viscosity (blood thickness), volume of red blood cells (hematocrit), and fibrinogen (a protein involved in the clotting process) among individuals who drank less than two glasses of water daily compared to those who drank five or more. When elevated, and even at high normal range, these factors are associated with coronary heart diseases. By not drinking enough water each day your blood is thicker, and this can lead poor heart health. Elevated values, in fact, are found years before acute cardiovascular problems show up, in early stages of atherosclerosis (arterial disease) and high blood pressure.  Not drinking enough water can cause low blood pressure too.

Chronic dehydration, where people are rarely drinking water have thicker blood, then slows the flows of blood in the circulatory system and the creates a greater the risk of nasty things happening, like inflammation, clots, plaque, and cardiac and vascular trouble.  Other reasons for thicker blood are eating animal fats, environmental reason, poor lifestyle choices, lack of exercise and processed foods.

Do you have symptoms of high blood viscosity?

◾Personal or family history of heart disease, stroke, hypertension or diabetes

◾Signs of decreasing cognitive function

◾Migraines

◾Sensorineural hearing loss

◾Ocular disorders such as macular degeneration or glaucoma

◾Rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation or chronic joint pain

◾Raynaud’s syndrome

◾Lupus

◾Women with a history of taking oral contraceptives, especially those designed to decrease the frequency of menstrual periods

◾Women who have had a hysterectomy, have irregular periods or are menopausal

◾Women with a history of pregnancy-induced hypertension or preeclampsia, especially those who are currently pregnant

◾Cirrhosis of the liver

◾Gout

Your heart works harder. Thicker blood is often full of toxins, bacteria, excess glucose and insulin, and other substances that stoke inflammation and damage to the fragile endothelial lining of blood vessels.  

Healthy blood is more like the consistency of wine, and not sludgy like tomato sauce.  Thicker, stickier blood is more abrasive and damages arterial walls. Thus, it not only affects how hard the heart has to work to circulate the blood, but also contributes to inflammation of the intimal lining of the vessels. It contributes to endothelial dysfunction, growth of atherosclerotic lesions, and plaque rupture. In addition, blood viscosity directly modulates peripheral vascular resistance. Impaired blood flow due to hyperviscosity leads to decreased oxygen and nutrients delivered to the tissues, affecting critical areas such as the brain, eyes, and kidneys.

Viscosity of the blood is very although overlooked risk factor for cardiovascular disease.  By simply remembering to drink more water daily you can reduce your risk of poor circulation in your body. 

Blood viscosity is the only biological parameter that has been correlated with all of the major cardiovascular risk factors including male gender, age, smoking, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and LDL cholesterol. It is inversely correlated with HDL cholesterol. However, blood viscosity is a statistically independent — and in certain ways, much stronger — biomarker for cardiovascular disease. Blood viscosity predicts heart attacks, strokes and mortality from heart disease independent of these other risk factors. including male gender, age, smoking, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and LDL cholesterol. It is inversely correlated with HDL cholesterol. However, blood viscosity is a statistically independent — and in certain ways, much stronger — biomarker for cardiovascular disease. Blood viscosity predicts heart attacks, strokes and mortality from heart disease independent of these other risk factors. including male gender, age, smoking, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and LDL cholesterol. It is inversely correlated with HDL cholesterol.  Blood viscosity is biomarker for cardiovascular disease and can be use to predicts heart attacks, strokes and mortality from heart disease independent unless changes are made to hydration, environment, stress and the foods we eat.

When you are dehydrated, you are contributed to thickening your blood. The key to preventing poor viscosity of the blood is not to become dehydrated.  Avoid tap water and drink 6-8 glass of Alkaline Genzon Water each day.